Representingthelollipopguild

redlilith:

the always amazing Sam Weber…echoes of wondrous dreams…

hifructosemag:

cross-connect:

Sam Weber born in Alaska is a New York-based illustrator, awarded a Gold Award by The Society of Illustrators and the Spectrum Annual. He graduated from The Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary, before completing a Masters at The School of Visual Arts in New York. His current clients include Time, DC and Rolling Stone.

Posted to Cross Connect by Margaret

Hi-Fructose featured artist Sam Weber.

thedisneyfan:

godbless-st-cyr:

A compilation of my favorite teacher/school related posts

THE TOP ONE THO

2headedsnake:

Adele K.

sh-ocking:

zaynhappened:

hatchworthsmoustache:

missjraffe:

cvn-t:

The hottest things I’ve ever been told.

I’m just picturing someone screaming “BONJOUR” at a penis

#SACRE BLEU MADEMOISELLE VAGINA#HON HON HON TITTY CROISSANTS

TITTY CROISSANTS

None of you should ever be having sex

sh-ocking:

zaynhappened:

hatchworthsmoustache:

missjraffe:

cvn-t:

The hottest things I’ve ever been told.

I’m just picturing someone screaming “BONJOUR” at a penis

#SACRE BLEU MADEMOISELLE VAGINA#HON HON HON TITTY CROISSANTS

TITTY CROISSANTS

None of you should ever be having sex

one direction: NA NA NA NA NA NA THAT'S WHAT MAKES YOU BEAUTIFUL
my chemical romance: NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA FROM MALL SECURITY
rihanna: OH NA NA WHAT'S MY NAME OH NA NA WHAT'S MY NAME
paul mccartney: NA NA NA NA NA NA HEY JUDE
gwen stefani: IF I WAS A RICH GIRL NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
blink-182: TURN THE LIGHTS OFF, CARRY ME HOME NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
pink: NA NA NA NA NA I WANNA START A FIGHT
batman: NA NA NA NA NA NA ME
sodium: Na
laughingsquid:

Delightfully Surreal Tehran Building Murals by Mehdi Ghadyanloov

conflictingheart:

the waitomo caves of new zealand’s northern island, formed two million years ago from the surrounding limestone bedrock, are home to an endemic species of bioluminescent fungus gnat (arachnocampa luminosa, or glow worm fly) who in their larval stage produce silk threads from which to hang and, using a blue light emitted from a modified excretory organ in their tails, lure in prey who then become ensnared in sticky droplets of mucus.

photos from spellbound waitomo tours, forevergone, blue polaris, and martin rietze. (more cave photos) (more bioluminescence photos)

engineeringisawesome:

This 3D-Printed Cast Uses Ultrasound to Heal Your Bones 40% Faster

3D-printed casts (an idea that’s been around for a couple years now) could alleviate the odor and itch issues caused by plaster casts, but even though they’re not widely available yet,Turkish student Deniz Karasahin has already taken the idea a step further. winner of the 2014 Golden A’Design Award, Karasahin’s Osteoid cast prototype uses tiny ultrasonic vibrations to speed up bone healing time by up to 40 percent.
The bone healing capabilities of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) have been known for decades, but the treatment is difficult to administer because it requires ultrasound leads to be placed on the skin, directly over the injured area of the bone. With traditional plaster casts this is basically impossible, but a 3D-printed cast that leaves patches of skin open would make it easy. Osteoid’s simple, skeletal design allows ultrasonic drivers to be built directly into the cast.
It’s still just a design prototype at this point, but given the rapid pace at which 3D scanning and printing technologies are progressing, we wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing these kinds of casts adorning the arms of reckless people all over the globe within the next year or two.

Digital Trends

engineeringisawesome:

This 3D-Printed Cast Uses Ultrasound to Heal Your Bones 40% Faster

3D-printed casts (an idea that’s been around for a couple years now) could alleviate the odor and itch issues caused by plaster casts, but even though they’re not widely available yet,Turkish student Deniz Karasahin has already taken the idea a step further. winner of the 2014 Golden A’Design Award, Karasahin’s Osteoid cast prototype uses tiny ultrasonic vibrations to speed up bone healing time by up to 40 percent.

The bone healing capabilities of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) have been known for decades, but the treatment is difficult to administer because it requires ultrasound leads to be placed on the skin, directly over the injured area of the bone. With traditional plaster casts this is basically impossible, but a 3D-printed cast that leaves patches of skin open would make it easy. Osteoid’s simple, skeletal design allows ultrasonic drivers to be built directly into the cast.

It’s still just a design prototype at this point, but given the rapid pace at which 3D scanning and printing technologies are progressing, we wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing these kinds of casts adorning the arms of reckless people all over the globe within the next year or two.

Digital Trends